Preliminary Schedule - AAH 2021

Association of Ancient Historians 2021
Preliminary Schedule

 

May 6

2:00-3:30 pm

Panel #1: Monuments and Their Reception

  1. Graham Oliver (Brown University), “The Half-Lives of (Inscribed) Monuments: Epigraphical Disposal in Ancient Greece”
  2. Todd E. Caissie (Rutgers University), “Monumental Time: The Many Iterations and Reception of the tropaeum alpium
  3. Amy Arezzolo (University of New England - Australia), “War Memorials and Motifs: The Dynamics of Classical Reception in Regional Australia”

 

3:30-4:00 pm: Break

 

4:00-5:30 pm

Panel #2: Recovery and Rebuilding I

  1. Stephen DeCasien (Texas A&M University), “The Second Naval Battle in the Syracusan Harbor 413 BCE: Reinterpretation, Tactics, and Technology”
  2. Joshua Allbright (University of Southern California), “Re-Membering Democracy: Athenian Civic Education after the Amnesty”
  3. Zsuzsanna Varhelyi (Boston University), “Finding a Community to Belong to in the Wake of Crisis: Recovery from the Civil Wars in Seneca the Elder”

 

6:00-7:00 pm Keynote #1

 

May 7

9:00-10:30 am

Panel #3: Power Relations and Popular Unrest I

  1. Jared Kreiner (Christopher Newport University), “Mass Movements Against Provincial Censuses under Augustus and Tiberius: Revolts or Popular Protests?”
  2. Brian Messner (Lincoln Christian University), “Pontius Pilate and Unrest in Judaea: Strategic Considerations”
  3. William Burghart (University of Washington, Tacoma), “Pleonexia and Popular Unrest in Polybius”

 

10:30-11:00 am: Break

 

11:00 am -12:30 pm

Panel #4: Diplomacy in the Ancient Mediterranean I: Greece

  1. Nick Cross (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy), “Ancient Greek Alliance Terminology: Symmachia and Its Antecedents”
  2. Philip Kaplan (University of North Florida), “In the Presence of the King: The Greek Common Peace and Persian Imperial Strategy in the Fourth Century BCE”
  3. Gregory Callaghan (University of Pennsylvania), “Cyzicus and the Bridge of Kinship: A Case Study of Attalid Access to Aegean Interstate Systems”

 

12:30-2:00 pm: Break

2:00-3:30 pm

Panel #5: New Assignments for Gen-Ed Students

  1. Lee L. Brice (Western Illinois University) and Theodora B. Kopestonsky (University of Tennessee at Knoxville), “Teaching General Education Classes with Material Culture: Coins”
  2. Chris Saladin (University of Minnesota), “Visualizing the Greek World: Collaborative Mapping in a History Survey Course”
  3. Bice Peruzzi (Rutgers University), “Learning Greek Pottery through Problem Based Learning Pedagogy”

     

3:30-4:00 pm: Break

4:00-5:30 pm

Panel #6: Power Relations and Popular Unrest II

  1. Tara Sewell-Lasater (University of Houston), “The Disregarded Cause: Popular Unrest and the Civil War of Ptolemy VIII and Kleopatra II”
  2. Paul A. Johstono (Air Command & Staff College), “Egyptian Soldiers, Egyptian Revolts? Interrogating the Role of Egyptian Military Personnel in Revolts against Ptolemaic Rule”
  3. Nathaniel S. Katz (The University of Texas at Austin), “Didius Julianus and the Plebs”

 

6:00-7:00 pm: Keynote #2

 

May 8

8:30-10:00 am

Panel #7: Sport and Mass Entertainment

  1. Eva Carrara (Florida State University), “Creating Kyniska: The Reception of the First Female Olympic Victor”
  2. Kathryn Murphy (Trinity College Dublin), “The Bear Necessities: Re-imagining Roman Animal Displays in an Age of Environmental Degradation”
  3. Amanda Devitt (St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan), “Practicalities of Circus Curses”

 

10:00-10:30 am: Break

 

10:30 am-12:00 pm

Panel #8: Recovery and Rebuilding II

  1. Barbara Mendoza (Santa Monica College), “The Tempest Stele: An Ancient Account of Disaster and Rebuilding”
  2. Tola Rodrick (Indiana University), “Memory, Biography, and Identity Construction in the Apophthegmata Patrum
  3. Mark Andrew Orsag (Doane University) (with Amanda McKinney, DeeAnn M. Reeder, and Lindsay Sears), “What Caused the Plague of Cyprian? A Proposed Multidisciplinary Solution to a Horrific 1,771 Year Old Mystery”

 

12:00-1:00 pm: Break

 

1:00-2:30 pm

Panel #9: Diplomacy in the Ancient Mediterranean II: Rome

  1. Pierre-Luc Brisson (McGill University), “Rome and Carthage: The ‘Enemy Image’ Under Mediterranean Unipolarity (188-146 BC)”
  2. Jake Nabel (Pennsylvania State University), “Rome, Parthia, and the Horizons of Ancient Diplomacy”
  3. Eliza Gettel (Villanova University), “Embassies from Hellas to Rome (1st to 3rd cent. CE)”

 

2:30-3:00 pm: Break

3:00-4:30 pm

Panel #10: Roman Social History

  1. Bruce W. Frier (University of Michigan), “Did Roman Tax Collectors Issue Stock?”
  2. Thomas A. Leibundgut (Stanford University), “The Migration of Women on the Iberian Peninsula during the Principate”
  3. Aura Piccioni (KU Eichstätt-Ingolstadt), “Retracing Bronze-Statues and Their Contexts in Roman Raetia”

 

 

4:30-5:00 pm: Break

5:30-7:00 pm Business Meeting

7:00 pm: Closing Remarks and Thanks